Tagged: nature

Technology Inspired by Nature… Musings & Examples

Technology makes our lives easier and more fulfilling. We can do things faster and more efficiently than ever before. This is no secret.

We have our GPS, which makes it less likely we’ll find ourselves out in the middle of nowhere (unless, of course, that is where we would like to be). It’s easier and faster to stay in touch and communicate with others we work with, family members on the other side of the globe, and those individuals who share our unusual fascination for things like duct tape art and collecting elongated coins. Technology has also allowed us to reach new feats in medical research and data collection. The list could continue for pages, but I won’t offer an exhaustive list (at least, not in this short post).

Throughout history, philosophers, scientists, and scholars, have recognized the influence nature has had on technological innovation. The most notable testimony of this insight is from ancient Greece— “technology learns from or imitates nature (Plato, Laws X 899a ff.). According to Democritus, for example, house-building and weaving were first invented by imitating swallows and spiders building their nests and nets, respectively” (source, section 1.1).

In my most recent post (in the spirit of celebrating National Great Outdoors Month) I posed the question of whether technology can bring us closer to nature. Now, I think it would be interesting to think of the ways that nature has inspired technological innovation. This will help us better understand why we innovate gadgets, gizmos, and apps.

Questions for Meditation:

What advances in technology in the modern age are inspired by nature? Is this important to consider when innovating technology? If so, why?

Leonardo da Vinci seemed to think so. He studied bats and birds, and sketched flying contraptions that mimicked the shape and mobility of their wings (source). Da Vinci is notorious for using what we now call biomimicry (an approach to innovation that seeks sustainable solutions to human challenges by emulating nature’s time-tested patterns and strategies).

Da Vinci stated, “Necessity is the mistress and guide of nature.” If we presume (like da Vinci) that necessity drives nature, would it benefit us to think that necessity should then drive technological innovation? Is technological innovation most successful when it is driven by nature, which is driven by necessity?

                                           Necessity –> Nature –> Technology    ?

      Below are some modern examples of nature inspiring technological innovation:


                                               (photo source)

  Burrs & Velcro                                                 

 “After a hunting trip in the Alps in 1941, Swiss engineer George de Mestral’s dog was covered in burdock burrs. Mestral put one under his microscope and discovered a simple design of hooks that nimbly attached to fur and socks.” (source) Voila, Velcro was born.



                                           (photo source)

Kingfisher Bird & Shinkansen Bullet Train           

Engineers were concerned with the sonic boom that train riders would experience after a high speed train they were inventing emerged from tunnels. After engineer Nakatsu observed the Kingfisher bird in nature, the problem was resolved.

“The Kingfisher is a type of bird that dives from the air, which has low resistance, into high-resistance water, and incredibly does it without splashing. Nakatsu thought the reason was the streamlined shape of its beak. They conducted tests to measure pressure waves arising from shooting bullets of various shapes into a pipe. The data showed that the ideal shape for this Shinkansen is almost identical to a kingfisher’s beak! They then fitted the front of the train with a design similar to the kingfisher’s beak, and the problem with the sonic booms was gone.” (source)


                                      (photo source)

Bees & Drones

Drone designers are now looking to bees to help them better understand how to make drones more efficient at navigating airspace.

“…motion-direction detecting circuits could be wired together to also detect motion-speed. This is how bees control their flight — and could very well be the future of how drones behave, too.” (source)


                                         (photo source)

Gecko Skin & Robots

“NASA has been learning a few tricks by observing the gecko.

Tiny hairs on their feet allow these small lizards to grip and climb walls – and they don’t lose their stickiness over time. The harder they press their feet, the stickier they become.

Aaron Parness and colleagues at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena have developed a material containing minute synthetic hairs that stick to a surface when a force is applied to make the hairs bend.

Prototype objects have been developed which might in future be able to act as anchors on board the International Space Station – but the technology may also be able to be used on its exterior, by repair or inspection robots.”

Using the same principle, researchers at Stanford University in the US have developed tiny robots that can drag more than 2,000 times their own weight. (source)


                                                     (photo source)

Butterfly Wings & E-readers

“Researchers developing color displays for e-readers are taking inspiration from an unlikely source: butterfly wings. Qualcomm MEMS Technologies created the first full-color, video-friendly e-reader prototype based on the way butterfly wings gleam in bright light. The display, known as Mirasol, works by reflecting light, instead of transmitting light from behind the screen the way LCD monitors do. The new type of screen can be read in bright sunlight and has longer battery life.” (source)


                                              (photo source)

Firefly Light Bulbs

“When insects of the genus Photuris light fires in their bellies, the radiance is amplified by their anatomy — sharp, jagged scales, according to research published in January [2103] by scientists from Belgium, France, and Canada.

Based on this observation, the scientists then built and laid a similar structure on a light-emitting diode (LED), which increased its brightness by 55 percent.” (source)


                                                  (photo source)

Algae & Biofuel

“Depending on your favorite species, algae can be eaten, burned for heat, or used to produce hydrogen, methane, biodiesel, or plain old fertilizer. Algae is so prolific, and comes in so many varieties, that it’s actually a chore to isolate your preferred species for cultivation out of a water sample from the wild. The best part is that algae soaks up the sun and lots of CO2 to work its magic. That’s two forms of renewable energy used to produce fuels or foods (sushi anyone?) in high demand.” (source)

What would you add to this list? Do you think that technology inspired by nature is inspired by necessity?

Comment below.








Can Technology Bring Us Closer to Nature?

June is now officially recognized as National Great Outdoors Month.

While we recognize this month, we’ll tell ourselves that we need to leave our tablets and smartphones back at home or the cabin as we hike the Appalachian Trail (or part of it), fish in the stream in our backyard, bike our way through the vast plains, or launch our boat from the nearby marina.

It’s summer time now and we all want to be outside.  We may not all, however, want to leave our beloved gadgets and apps behind. We have photos and stories to share with the world! And we know we can’t leave emails from our boss or potential clients neglected for too long.


We think about what photos and moments we want to capture and share on social media as we hike along…




It’s no secret that technology pervades every aspect of our lives; how we work, where we work, how we learn, how we communicate. The list goes on and on…

And with the constant innovation of new phone apps, gizmos and gadgets, we are all being told now that we should disconnect more frequently from our devices and social media accounts.

Being glued to our screens constantly shrinks our brains, makes us lazy thinkers, makes us suffer from “text claw” and could wreck our spines, makes us emotionally unstable because we are getting lonely  and sad as we scroll through our Facebook feeds, and makes us more irritable because we aren’t sleeping due to our circadian rhythm being all out of whack… so they* say.

*“they” here is referring to those individuals who conduct medical and psychological studies regarding effects of technology use on us mortals who all need to constantly remember to lead healthier and more balanced lifestyles (whatever that means) … far, far away from blue screens that haunt us at night as we try to sleep but can’t escape… from the addictive power of Netflix.

While all of that might be true… just for a few moments, I’d like to think about how technology could bring us closer to nature.

And while we should definitely experience the outdoors more while the sun is out in full force, I would like to pose two questions for meditation:

1- Should we view technology and nature as opposites? (Man vs Machine)

 2- In order to take full advantage of the great outdoors and appreciate it, do we need to leave all of our gizmos, gadgets, devices, and apps behind?

Perhaps we should consider a different perspective, where nature and technology meet; a perspective where technology not only allows us to appreciate the great outdoors more, but can even potentially save a life and make our lives more fulfilling, while we’re surrounded by fresh foliage and chirping herons.

Consider the following before you go explore the great outdoors:

  • The American Red Cross mobile apps provide information for:
    • Administering first aid (even for Rover, your furry pal who’s hiking with you)
    • Local weather patterns
    • How to prepare for a natural disaster


  • There are apps that allow you to navigate the terrain in front of you before you attempt to tackle it, so you don’t encounter terrain that you aren’t prepared to cover or that has changed due to recent weather (source). And let’s not forget the often taken for granted GPS. You know, Google even has maps for a lot more than city streets (google it).




Even though the above list is short, it exemplifies how technology can potentially bring us even closer to appreciating our experiences in the outdoors (opposed to the trending theme that blue screens are evil and will kill us all).


What do you think? Do you have an app or device that you love to use when in the great outdoors; that allows you to appreciate nature more than you would without it? Or do you believe in the sanctity of disconnecting completely while you listen to birds singing and the nearby brook babble?

Comment below.